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Microdosing Mushrooms The Latest From Silicon Valley

Aug 30

Introduction

The landscape of Silicon Valley is changing. For years, the region was dominated by startups and venture capitalists, but now, more established corporations are moving in. At the same time, tech companies are looking at new ways to increase productivity among their employees, including microdosing mushrooms—a practice that has become increasingly popular in Silicon Valley over the last few years.

“Just as the microdoses are never enough to be hallucinogenic or have any effects that would be noticeable, their lack of effects was also what was so remarkable. I’d have a little bit of focus, a little bit of energy and insight. but I wouldn’t feel anything.”

This is an extremely important point that has been made by many people who are experimenting with microdosing: the fact that you can't notice any difference at all between your normal state and when you're microdosing means that there's something going on that isn't being observed by your senses. A lot of people believe this has something to do with psychedelics having some kind of effect on serotonin levels in the brain; however, others think it might be because psilocybin helps break down existing neural connections so they can start forming new ones instead (this idea comes from a study done in 2017).

Whether or not these theories are correct still remains unclear; however, what we do know is that there's no evidence yet showing either way whether or not microdosing actually works. In other words…we don't know if it does anything at all!

“It seems like there’s a kind of imperative to become a polymath, to understand everything about the world. And it seems like psychedelic drugs are one way people will achieve that end in the next few decades. It’s almost an inevitability; it’s not going to stop. The only question is how you do it right and how you do it wrong.”

The idea that there is an imperative to become a polymath—to understand everything about the world—has been around for centuries. In his book, Kahneman talks about how this drive has intensified as we’ve evolved from hunter-gatherers to farmers, then industrialists and now information workers. We are constantly bombarded with more information than ever before, which creates an overwhelming need for humans to process it all in some way.

Kahneman believes psychedelic drugs are one way people will achieve that end in the next few decades. “It seems like there’s a kind of imperative to become a polymath, to understand everything about the world. And it seems like psychedelic drugs are one way people will achieve that end in the next few decades," he says on his podcast You Are Not So Smart (YANSS). "It’s almost an inevitability; it’s not going to stop."

“I felt like I had access to this inner ocean of creativity and feelings and thoughts. I could ask myself questions without being limited by my old conditioning, without being hemmed in by my memory or my past experiences. There was just this very open feeling where I could see that ideas were connected in ways that they haven’t been before.”

This is the first time he's ever tried mushrooms, and he's experiencing a new level of creativity and thought. He describes it as having access to an "inner ocean" of thought and feeling that was previously unavailable to him.

"Psychedelic drugs can be more dangerous than marijuana, but they don't have to be more dangerous than alcohol."

"Psychedelic drugs can be more dangerous than marijuana, but they don't have to be more dangerous than alcohol."

That's the message that Paul Austin, CEO of Californian microdosing startup Compass Pathways, wants you to take away from his company's new study on the effects of psilocybin mushrooms. The study found that "microdosing" with mushrooms—taking small amounts of psilocybin (the active ingredient in magic mushrooms) daily for a month or so—affects people differently depending on their genetics and what else is happening in their lives.

The paper also found that psilocybin doesn't seem to have any long-term negative effects on users. In fact, it could even help people with depression and anxiety disorders recover from addiction or treat mental illness.

This isn't the first time someone has tried to prove that psilocybin isn't as harmful as other drugs like heroin or cocaine; back in 2017 a team at Johns Hopkins University published a similar study on rats showing no negative effects linked directly to consuming low doses regularly over time

Silicon Valley is looking at mushrooms as a potential drug to increase productivity among high-achievers.

Microdosing is the act of taking a small amount of psilocybin mushrooms and then going about your business. It creates a feeling similar to being drunk, but without all the negative side effects. This can be done regularly, or as needed.

Microdosing has been around for decades and was popularized by people like Timothy Leary and his “turn on, tune in and drop out” movement in the 1960s. Most people believed that he was just trying to get high, but he actually wanted everyone to use mushrooms as a way to increase productivity while minimizing their negative side effects (like nausea).

Conclusion

The potential of microdosing mushrooms is exciting. The research shows that they can help people learn more quickly and retain information better, which could be an incredible boon to Silicon Valley workers who are constantly trying to keep up with the latest technology.

It’s important to note that while this post focused on Silicon Valley workers, it's not just them who could benefit from this new trend in drug use: anyone looking for a boost in creativity or productivity may want to give microdosing mushrooms a try!